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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Resources 

Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255
Contact the Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255, press 1 (text 838255)

What is Posttraumatic Stress Disorder?

PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) is a mental health problem that some people develop after experiencing or witnessing a life-threatening event, like combat, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault.

It's normal to have upsetting memories, feel on edge, or have trouble sleeping after this type of event. At first, it may be hard to do normal daily activities, like go to work, go to school, or spend time with people you care about. But most people start to feel better after a few weeks or months.

If it's been longer than a few months and you're still having symptoms, you may have PTSD. For some people, PTSD symptoms may start later on, or they may come and go over time.

The National Center for PTSD is dedicated to research and education on trauma and PTSD. We work to assure that the latest research findings help those exposed to trauma.

What are the Symptoms of PTSD?

PTSD symptoms usually start soon after the traumatic event, but they may not appear until months or years later. They also may come and go over many years. If the symptoms last longer than four weeks, cause you great distress, or interfere with your work or home life, you might have PTSD.

There are four types of symptoms of PTSD, but they may not be exactly the same for everyone. Each person experiences symptoms in their own way.

1. Reliving the event (also called re-experiencing symptoms). You may have bad memories or nightmares. You even may feel like you're going through the event again. This is called a flashback.

2. Avoiding situations that remind you of the event. You may try to avoid situations or people that trigger memories of the traumatic event. You may even avoid talking or thinking about the event.

3. Having more negative beliefs and feelings. The way you think about yourself and others may change because of the trauma. You may feel guilt or shame. Or, you may not be interested in activities you used to enjoy. You may feel that the world is dangerous and you can't trust anyone. You might be numb, or find it hard to feel happy.

4. Feeling keyed up (also called hyperarousal). You may be jittery, or always alert and on the lookout for danger. Or, you may have trouble concentrating or sleeping. You might suddenly get angry or irritable, startle easily, or act in unhealthy ways (like smoking, using drugs and alcohol, or driving recklessly.

Where to get help for PTSD

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/where-to-get-help.asp

Resources:

• Understaing PTSD & PTSD Treatment Download the FREE eBooklet

• FREE Anaoymous online screenings available Here

• AboutFace- Learn about posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from Veterans who've experienced it. Hear their stories. Find out how treatment turned their lives around.

• Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255

• Contact the Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255, press 1 (text 838255)

Watch PTSD videos

 

 

 

 

source: www.ptsd.va.gov